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12 Everyday Objects That Use Coding (or Computers)

In the modern world, coding and computers are used in almost every aspect of life. From phones to cars to coffee makers, coding is everywhere! But did you know that there are everyday objects that use coding or computers?

In this blog post, we will explore 12 everyday objects found in our homes, workplaces and daily lives that use coding or computers. We’ll discuss how they work, why they need code and how it affects our lives. So let’s take a look at these surprisingly tech-savvy items – you may be surprised at what you find!

1. Washing Machine

Washing machine that uses coding in every life
Photo by PlanetCare @ Unsplash

Washing machines use coding to set the cycle time, temperature, and speed. Depending on the type of fabric, a machine can determine how long a cycle should run, what water temperature is best and the strength of the agitation.

How it works: A programmable microcontroller is used to direct the washing machine’s actions. This processor reads the inputs and sends signals to the actuators that control the washing machine’s functions. Every time you change a setting, the program is updated to suit your needs.

  • Approximate lines of code: 8,000
  • Languages used: Assembly, C, and Java

2. TV and Remote Control

person holding remote pointing at TV
Photo by freestocks @ Unsplash

TVs and remote controls use coding to send signals from the remote to the TV. This code is used to change channels, adjust the volume and access menus.

How it works: The TV remote uses an infrared LED beam to send a signal that is received by a sensor in the TV. This signal contains encoded information that the TV can interpret and act on accordingly.

  • Approximate lines of code: 500-1,000 for standard digital TV and 10,000+ for smart TV
  • Languages used: Assembly, C, and Java

3. Refrigerator

yellow and red plastic packs in refrigerator
Photo by Tan Vic Tor @ Unsplash

Refrigerators use coding to control the temperature, monitor energy usage and even provide you with reminders about what groceries you need to buy.

How it works: A programmable microcontroller is used to monitor the temperature inside the refrigerator and adjust it accordingly. It also monitors the amount of energy being used and can even be programmed to provide you with reminders or alerts.

  • Approximate lines of code: 8,000-10,000
  • Languages used: Assembly, C, and Java

4. Coffee Maker

person using coffeemaker with white ceramic mug
Photo by John Schnobrich @ Unsplash

Coffee makers use coding to control the brewing process, set the temperature and timer, and even adjust the strength of your cup of coffee.

How it works: A programmable microcontroller is used to monitor and adjust all aspects of the coffee making process. It can be programmed to brew a specific type of coffee, as well as set the temperature and timer.

  • Approximate lines of code: 200-300
  • Languages used: Assembly, C, and Java
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5. Oven/Microwave

white microwave oven turned off
Photo by Erik Mclean @ Unsplash

Ovens and microwaves use coding to control the temperature, cooking time and other settings.

How it works: Just like with a washing machine or refrigerator, ovens and microwaves use programmable microcontrollers to monitor all aspects of the cooking process. The controller takes in inputs from the user (time, temperature, etc.), and sends signals to the actuators that control the oven/microwave’s functions.

  • Approximate lines of code: 8,000
  • Languages used: Assembly, C, and Java

6. Cellphone

black iphone 5 on red table
Photo by Shiwa ID @ Unsplash

Cellphones use coding to provide users with access to the internet, send and receive messages, make calls and access applications.

How it works: Cellphones use a combination of software and hardware to provide users with access to these functions. The software is coded in languages such as C++, Java and HTML5, while the hardware includes a processor, memory and radio transceivers.

  • Approximate lines of code: 10 million – 20 million
  • Languages used: C++, Java, HTML5

7. Car

parked white Ford Explorer SUV
Photo by Sven D @ Unsplash

Cars use coding to control the engine, run diagnostic tests, keep track of fuel efficiency and even detect potential problems.

How it works: Cars are equipped with a computer system that monitors all aspects of its performance. This system is coded to be run as software, allowing it to interpret inputs from sensors and send signals to the actuators that control the car’s functions.

  • Approximate lines of code: 100 million – 250 million
  • Languages used: C, C++, Java, and Assembly

8. Watch

Apple Watch as an everyday object that uses coding
Photo by David Švihovec @ Unsplash

Watches use coding to keep track of the time, store information and even provide reminders. Digital watches and smart watches use programming, while analog watches typically do not.

How it works: Watches are equipped with a processor that is used to interpret inputs from sensors and send signals to actuators that control the watch’s functions. The code used by this processor can be programmed to perform various tasks, such as keeping track of time, storing information and providing reminders.

  • Approximate lines of code: 500-2,500 for simple digital watches and 10,000+ for smart watches
  • Languages used: Assembly, C and Java

9. Traffic lights

yellow painted traffic light
Photo by David Guenther @ Unsplash

Traffic lights use coding to control the timing of the light and when it changes from red to green.

How it works: Traffic lights are programmed with a specific set of instructions that dictate when the light should change from red to green and back again. This is done using a programmable microcontroller, which uses software that is coded in languages such as C and Assembly.

  • Approximate lines of code: 1,000-2,000
  • Languages used: C and Assembly

10. Elevators

white wooden door closed in room
Photo by Edwin Chen @ Unsplash

Elevators use coding to control the speed, direction and timing of their movements. It also controls the sequence of stops and opening and closure of the doors.

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How it works: Elevators are equipped with a computer system that is coded in languages such as C, Java and Assembly. This system interprets inputs from sensors, such as the elevator’s position or weight, and sends signals to actuators that control the elevator’s functions.

  • Approximate lines of code: 50,000-100,000
  • Languages used: C, Java and Assembly

11. Electronic Scales

person standing on white digital bathroom scale
Photo by I Yunmai @ Unsplash

Electronic scales use coding to measure weight and display the results on the screen.

How it works: Electronic scales use a programmable microcontroller to interpret inputs from sensors and send signals to actuators that control the scale’s functions.

  • Approximate lines of code: 5,000-15,000
  • Languages used: C and Assembly.

12. Smoke Detector

Photo by Jasmin Sessler @ Unsplash

Smoke detectors use coding to detect the presence of smoke and sound an alarm.

How it works: Smoke detectors are equipped with a computer system that is coded in languages such as C, Java and Assembly. This system interprets inputs from sensors, such as smoke particles, and sends signals to actuators that control the detector’s functions.

  • Approximate lines of code: 2,000-5,000
  • Languages used: C, Java and Assembly.

As you can see, coding is used in many everyday objects to make them smarter and more efficient. From cars and watches, to traffic lights and smoke detectors, coding can be found everywhere. Whether you’re aware of it or not, coding is making our lives easier and improving the way we interact with technology. So next time you use any of these everyday objects, remember that coding is at work!

What Is Coding?

Coding is the process of creating computer programs using programming languages. Programs are written in a specific language, such as JavaScript or Python, and then converted into machine-readable code that can be used by a computer to perform tasks.

Coding allows us to create websites, mobile apps and software, automate processes and more. It’s also used in everyday objects, such as watches and traffic lights, to make them smarter and more efficient. Coding can be used in almost anything — if you can think it, chances are it can be coded!

Coding has revolutionized the way we interact with technology and has made it easier for us to do things like order food, watch movies or shop online. It’s also made it easier for developers to create new technologies and has enabled us to explore possibilities we never thought possible.

By understanding how coding works, you can open up a world of possibilities and create things that were once thought impossible. So, if you’re looking to get into coding or want to learn more, don’t be afraid to dive in and start exploring!

Why Use Coding In Everyday Objects?

Coding is used in everyday objects for a number of reasons. It can help automate processes and make them more efficient, as well as improve safety and accuracy.

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It also allows us to control how the object works, customize it according to our needs, create new features and use data analysis to gain insights into how it’s being used. Coding can even be used to create interactive experiences, such as gaming apps or virtual reality simulations.

In short, coding is an essential part of our everyday lives and allows us to make more informed decisions about how we use technology. Whether you’re a developer looking to create something new or just curious about coding, understanding how it works can help you get the most out of your everyday objects.

How Are Everyday Objects Programmed?

Everyday objects are programmed using coding languages such as C, Java and Assembly. These languages allow developers to create programs that can interpret inputs from sensors, send signals to actuators that control the object’s functions and display results on a screen.

The amount of code used in everyday objects varies depending on the complexity of the object, but generally it can range from a few hundred lines of code to many thousands.

The process of encoding everyday objects starts with a developer creating the code for the object and testing it.

Once it’s been tested, the code is compiled into machine-readable code and loaded onto the object’s processor. Once this is complete, the object is ready to be used!

Now, every time that a user interacts with the object, its processor will run the code and respond accordingly.

Conclusion

In conclusion, coding is used in many everyday objects to make them smarter and more efficient. From refrigerators and washing machines to traffic lights and smoke detectors, coding can be found everywhere.

Coding allows us to create websites, mobile apps and software, automate processes and more. It’s also used in everyday objects to help control how they work, customize them to our needs and create new features.

Understanding how coding works can open up a world of possibilities for developers and everyday users alike. So, why not start exploring and see what you can create? You never know what you might discover!